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Thread: PROJECT WASP - Journey, Tips & Update on Yella Terra's PHASE III kit

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    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    PROJECT WASP - Journey, Tips & Update on Yella Terra's PHASE III kit

    As the title suggests this thread is about the ongoing journey of the WASP project, my 2005 Raid Mk2 BA GT.

    I’m sure many of you know, or have followed this project in the past and are probably aware of the car’s interesting modification history. For the sake of those that don’t, I have provided a brief summary of how this project began. The point of the thread is not to rehash the past however. It is to share my non-technical experience and tips for any would be modifiers looking to embark on such a project. If my journey can help another in any way the time in putting this thread together will be worthwhile.

    Last edited by WASP; 7th April 2012 at 06:56 PM.

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    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    Background

    After a year or so of ownership and through my interest and in the US based supercharged GT500 Mustangs , in 2006 I embarked on a project to convert my GT into what would become my own personal version of what a modern GTHO could represent. While installing a supercharger on a BOSS 290 wasn’t anything remarkable back then, especially of the centrifugal variety, using a positive displacement blower that was ADR compliant with a factory-like integrated stealth appearance was something more unique. For me personally the emergence of this 2.3ltr Whipple unit which fit beautifully beneath the plenum and was ADR compliant became the catalyst for change. This Australian innovation by Yella Terra also aligned well with my interest and values in regards to supporting Aussie ingenuity and design.

    Adding more power and torque however was only ever going to be one part of the total equation. I wanted this GT to breathe deeply and have big cubic inch like torque, character and sound which required much more than just a supercharger to achieve. To become a true reflection on what a factory GTHO would be like other areas of the GT would also need enhancing to make all the systems work cohesively from an engineering and drivability point of view. From engine and camshaft design and configuration to brakes, suspension, exhaust header design, muffler design, driveline enhancements, induction and fuel delivery systems and more. All of which would require great attention and care in order to create a total performance package that worked like it was always meant to do from the outset, yet had a rawness to it also. Sounds easy in theory doesn’t it!..



    Last edited by WASP; 29th February 2012 at 10:44 PM.

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    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    Reflections on past experience

    Fast forwarding to 2012, itís been one hell of a journey. There has been many trials and tribulations, ..many lessons learnt along the way to. While I would like to think I have got most things right in the process I also acknowledge there were some poor choices made through my lack of knowledge and awareness.

    Despite how things looked on the outside this project has presented many challenges, disappointments and criticisms along the way. Quite frankly, while frustrating these issues were they served to tested my resolve and focus on the end goal. Despite having frequent moments where I want to walk away I never lost my vision on what I set out to achieve.

    I knew in my mind exactly what I wanted to create. This helped me to make hard decisions and deal with resistance from what seemed at times to be an endless barrage of nay sayers and people telling me it canít be done, I donít know what Iím doing or I should have done this way or that way... Some of people were right, most werenít. There were those who pretended to have my best interest at heart, but where later found to have another agenda. There were those that literally blew me away with their generosity, interest and care. Point is, these were all experiences which I will carry for a long time and will benefit myself and others in the future. Despite how things sound I do appreciate constructive feedback and having my ideaís challenged by those I respect. This is an important part of the process and I would not have gotten this far without this input.

    Over the past 3 years the WASP has undergone some extensive work and development. This includes 2 motor ground up builds, 3 exhaust systems with multiple custom variations, 2 versions of the supercharger kits and multiple custom variations, 3 induction and fuel delivery systems, 3 intercooling systems , 2 braking systems and the list goes on. The GT has been to no less than 7 or 8 emission testing sessions and we are still not quite there yet by a poof-tenth of a hydrocarbon!







    Last edited by WASP; 29th February 2012 at 10:51 PM.

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    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    More recent activities and transition to PHASE III

    The WASP today I’m please to say is in good hands. Thanks to Spiro at Autotech and Jim and Matt from Yella Terra, the WASP project will finally be realised. It has certainly taken much longer than I anticipated but to be fair to all involved I have been somewhat complacent with this regard. For almost 3 years now I have been very preoccupied with another building project, this time it was for my family (a new family home). To some degree this project was a thank you from me for being so supportive and patient over the years while I have been building my company amongst other things.




    As for more current activities, as I type this the supercharger assembly has been removed again and in the good hands of Matt Smith at Yella Terra. The 2.4ltr Whipple pump is getting a one over and upgrade to the new ‘Phase III’ specification. This includes a much larger intercooler core (50% more capacity), larger CNC port runners and a new manifold design which has being changed from billet aluminium to cast. The advantage of doing this comes down to cooling properties and efficiency which helps to lower manifold discharge temps. While billet looks great, is strong and is more expensive it also holds heat longer than cast alloy. The larger inner core is now one of, if not the largest on the market and combined with my custom SRT8 front intercooler will ensure we achieve the optimum cooling environment possible.

    The results of this are claimed to be class leading in terms of cooling capacity and efficiency, a past criticism of the past versions of the kit although I never really experienced this to any extreme personally on the last upgrade to the 2.4lt Gen2 pump. Only the first, original 2.3ltr kit did I notice and see the power drop off after repeated runs.

    Combined with the other enhancements to this vehicle the results should reflect what I hope is a strong example of Yella Terra’s innovation and engineering capability, complimented by the work and care provided by Spiro and his team at Autotech Enginnering. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank a good friend of mine, Paul who is more known as GTP370 with the BOSS twin turbo. Paul has gone out of his way to help and support me throughout this project. Thanks mate. I could not have got this far without your care and assistance.

    Once the supercharger is complete and reassembled the plan is to finish emission testing, detail, and retune the vehicle ready to return home. In the meantime I will be posting up photo’s of the upgrade process compliments of Matt Smith from Yella Terra.

    Stay tuned.




    Last edited by WASP; 7th April 2012 at 07:06 PM.

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    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    My10 tips to those embarking on a major modification project

    My advice from my experience has been distilled down into the follow tips.

    1. Accept that in the aftermarket modification game that as a consumer you will need have clarity on what you are doing, particularly before taking action of significant consequence. Make a plan that reflects what you want the outcome to be and how you expect to get there. Also include in your plan a generous allowance for contingency as you are most certainly going to need it.
    2. Resist instant gratification and avoid rushing in. Take your time and do your research first. Be ruthless in your endeavour to leave no stone left unturned. Remember what you donít know in this game will most likely bite you later. As the saying goes those who hold the knowledge hold the power.
    3. If you are not mechanically minded then find someone you trust that is, and make sure they are on the same page as you by sharing your plan and expectations. Itís important that this person can be objective and can tell it to you straight.
    4. Pick the people and workshops you use carefully. Donít pick people just become you like them or your mate used them for some minor work. Pick them because they have a proven track record in what you want to achieve and have experienced failure as well as success. Most importantly they should have been where you want to go and gained knowledge from this experience.
    5. Understand your car is not an asset. Itís a liability and will become an even greater once modified. If you donít like the sound of that then donít start in the first place.
    6. Discuss costs up front with your service provider and agree on how and when things will be done in writing. Remember when negotiating that in the end you only get what you pay for. If you pay average money and you use average people you will get average results.
    7. Listen to credible experts but be absolutely clear on what you want the outcome to be. Donít let the pressure of others sway you into making important decisions that fit with their own expectations and ideas and not with yours.
    8. Never lose sight that no matter what happens itís your money and itís your car. Be mindful that you are responsible and will be held accountable for whatever happens to it.
    9. Donít overlook the smaller details, no matter how insignificant you might think they are. Small things have a habit of turning into the bigger things.
    10. Lastly, expect to be challenged, expect to be patient and expect to put in the time and care necessary if what youíre doing actually matters.





    Last edited by WASP; 29th February 2012 at 10:28 PM.

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    Validated User gary vann's Avatar
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    thank you for sharing , i will be looking foward to see the end result

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    I dropped into to catch up with Spiro the week before last - looked the Wasp and thought oh what a waste living in this workshop for so long.
    Understand your reasons Col and glad to hear its back on the go and soon to be finished, well done.
    YNWA ! off to CL 2018.
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    Thanks for the insight Colvile. I have modified a few cars in my time (not to your extent) but i can totally agree with your check list. I have been caught and left dissapointed a few times by mechanics and also by me not understanding things fully. This has led me to be very thorough in my modifications now days.

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    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for the comments.

    I understand how things must appear in regards to the car seemingly wasting away there Maurie. To a degree it has been sitting there 'wasting' although there has been progress going on behind the scenes that has proven to be quite time consuming. Reaching emissions has contributed to a lot of the delays. My car was also used for development of a new duel pump, billet designed in tank system which took several phototypes and testing to get right. This avoided the need for a surge tank which didn’t comply with street use legalities due to safety concerns. This exercise took almost 10 months but the result is now benefiting not only myself, but many other Autotech customers who run high output vehicles and are seeking an alternative solution to using surge tanks.

    Thanks Tim for your comments on my 'Tips'. I was concerned that the check list might be stating the obvious, but I decided to add it regardless. I know when I started this project if I had of used that list as a guide to help me it would have probably saved me thousands of dollars and a lot of time.

    And Gary, I look forward to seeing the end result to and then getting her home where her new Gargage is awaiting...

  10. #10
    This is one of my favourite bulds - that and Wade's ex ute (now Grum's) - and I actually have a crush on it; every time I go passed Autotech I sit there salivating for a few moments before I move on. Perfect stance, perfect colour, perfect shape, and by the way you've described it's journey, it looks as though it will have one of the best drivelines and chassis set-ups. Well done mate.

    Also, thanks for the tips; advice like this can save anyone heartache and lots of money.
    ďÖThe lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man are disgraceful to ourselves onlyÖHow one man single-handedly, could weld warring tribes and wandering Bedouins into a most powerful and civilized nation in less than two decadesÖ.A silent great soul, one of that who cannot but be earnest. He was to kindle the world; the worldís Maker had ordered so." - Thomas Carlyle

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