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Thread: 2015 Focus

  1. #21
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    Id buy a Mazda over a VW any day for reliability.

    VW does nothing for me unless your talking R.
    2017 FORD PXII WILDTRAK 4X4 (waiting patiently for Raptor).
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  2. #22
    Validated User VZTRT's Avatar
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    http://www.drive.com.au/new-car-revi...03-gkq2s3.html

    Ford Focus Titanium new car review

    Blue oval's updated hatch is more convincing than ever, but still doesn't stand out from the crowd.
    Andrew MacLean November 6 2015 - 6:00AM

    Andrew MacLean

    Small cars are big business in Australia these days as fuel-conscious families continue to swing away from traditional large sedans and towards hatchbacks as suburban runabouts.

    While the Toyota Corolla, Mazda3 and Hyundai i30 battle for honours as the country's favourite new car, Ford hasn't achieved the same level of sales success with its rival Focus despite the latest-generation hatch and sedan being critically acclaimed and winning back-to-back Drive Car of the Year Small Car category crowns in 2011 and 2012.

    For 2015, following the earlier arrival of the high-performance ST variant, the blue oval has refreshed its mainstream Focus range with a new, more efficient engine, revised styling and a host of new technologies.

    What do you get?

    The small car category is one of the most competitive segments around with more than 15 different models to choose from, spanning cut-price contenders to high-class European hatches with most offering a variety of engine options and model grades.

    Ford has decided to drop its entry-level Ambiente grade from the latest Focus family, with the revised three-tier model range now kicking-off at $23,390 (plus on-road costs) for the Trend the highest starting price among its rivals.

    For that though, you do get a decent spread of equipment that includes cloth trim, 16-inch alloy wheels, climate control and Ford's latest Sync2 infotainment system that features an 8.0-inch colour touch screen with integrated sat nav, Bluetooth connectivity and a reverse camera with rear parking sensors.

    Stepping up to the mid-grade Sport (which costs $26,490) adds 17-inch wheels, a body kit, sports seats, keyless entry with push button start, ambient interior lighting, dual-zone climate control and a higher grade Sony audio system with digital radio tuning.

    The flagship Titanium model we're testing which costs $32,690 (plus on-roads) adds even more goodies, such as leather interior trim, power adjustments for the driver's seat, 18-inch alloys, front parking sensors and Ford's latest suite of active driver aids, including automated emergency braking, blind spot and rear traffic warnings and automated parking assistance.

    All Focus models are fitted with six airbags, are covered by Ford's three-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, come with a free 12-month auto club membership for roadside assistance and sit under a lifetime capped price servicing scheme with 12 monthly/15,000km intervals.

    What's inside?

    The most significant change inside the cabin of the updated Focus is the adoption of Ford's latest touch screen multimedia system, which offers a much more comprehensive suite of functions in a display that is divided into quarters for entertainment, navigation, phone and climate control.

    It is certainly easy to use, the Bluetooth connection is quick, the Sony speakers provide good sound quality and the maps are clear, all of which can be controlled via logical instructions through the voice activation technology. And the whole Sync2 system reduces the clutter and confusion of the button-laden dash in the previous Focus.

    Otherwise, little else has changed. The overall design is still a little busy and the menu system for the information screen in the instrument pod (for trip, fuel economy and other settings) is difficult to navigate through initially, but there's plenty of adjustment in the seating position for the driver, good vision and the general ergonomics are sound with all the controls in a logical place.

    The front seats are also comfortable and supportive in the right places, there's enough small item storage spaces and it feels well built with good quality materials.

    As for space, the dark plastics make it feel cosier than it really is with good headroom for both front and rear occupants and more legroom in the back than more popular rivals.

    Under the bonnet

    Ford has followed the downsizing trend with the latest Focus, replacing a range of engines including deleting its diesel option with a smaller 1.5-litre turbo charged four cylinder in all mainstream models. Only the Focus ST hot hatch gets a unique engine with its high performance 2.0-litre motor.

    Still, the smaller 1.5-litre Ecoboost (which is Ford-speak for turbo) produces more power and torque and better fuel consumption than any of the previous petrol engines, generating a healthy outputs for its capacity, with peak power of 132kW while maximum torque of 240Nm is spread across a wide range of revs between 1600rpm and 5000rpm.

    Driving the front wheels through a smooth-shifting six-speed automatic transmission, the engine feels really flexible with plenty of low-speed urgency and a strong mid-range, helping the Focus feel spritely away from a standstill and also effortless at cruising speeds.

    It does get a bit gruff under heavy acceleration and runs out of puff higher up in the rev range, both of which discourage enthusiastic drivers from tapping into its full performance and detracts from the refinement in the rest of the drivetrain.

    As for fuel consumption, Ford admits the top-spec Titanium with its extra equipment and standard automatic is least efficient of the new Focus range, but its claimed 6.4L/100km figure is on-par with most of its rivals. It's also not out of the ballpark in the real world, as we recorded 6.6L/100km during a mix of city and freeway driving.

    On the road

    The Focus has always been a dynamic benchmark in the small car class, and Ford hasn't messed with formula in the latest update.

    The electric power steering is fluid in its movement across the ratio and yet feels elastic in its weighting as it positively returns to centre. It also provides decent communication from the front wheels, which turn-in with purchase, have the ability to carry decent cornering speeds and handle the wide torque spread without losing traction.

    In fact, the Focus' overall dynamic character is one that is well balanced. The suspension is composed over most bumps, offering a comfortable ride on anything but the roughest roads, and yet it is equally engaging and chuckable on a spirited back country blast through the bends.

    The biggest gripe is that you often skip D for drive and slide the gear lever all the way to its Sport setting first. And also the up-down buttons on the side of the gear lever for manual shifting are slow to react and completely counter intuitive particularly compared with steering wheel paddles or even a tap shift function.

    Verdict

    Ford has attended to most of the shortcomings in the previous Focus by improving its exterior design, connectivity and fuel economy without meddling with its dynamic attributes, which makes the upgraded model more convincing than ever. While there's nothing left on the table with the top-spec Titanium in terms of luxury, safety or driving nous, it still doesn't stand out among the crowded small car segment.

    2015 Ford Focus Titanium price and specifications

    Price: $32,690 plus on-road costs

    Engine: 1.5-litre four-cylinder turbo petrol

    Power: 132kW at 6000rpm

    Torque: 240Nm at 1600-5000rpm

    Transmission: 6-spd dual-clutch automatic, front-wheel drive

    Fuel Use: 6.4L/100km

  3. #23
    Sir Car Reviews Franco Cozzo's Avatar
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    I thought they ditched the DSG for a regular slushbox?

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  5. #24
    Validated User VZTRT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Damo View Post
    I thought they ditched the DSG for a regular slushbox?
    Thought they changed to the diesel one. Its the dry DSG thats failing.

  6. #25
    Tech Admin flappist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dash gt View Post
    Id buy a Mazda over a VW any day for reliability.

    VW does nothing for me unless your talking R.
    A buddy of mine has an 'R'. He will never buy another one.....
    A velocitatem terram

    Google-Fu, the ancient snowflake art of knowing little, understanding less but believing anything they find on Google as the word of God.

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  8. #26
    Danger Zone! Paxton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VZTRT View Post
    Thought they changed to the diesel one. Its the dry DSG thats failing.
    Nope. It's a proper Torque Converting Auto.

    Far better in my opinion.
    I'm in love with my car. Got a feel for my automobile.

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    Franco Cozzo (6th November 2015),imike1 (27th September 2016),jpd80 (12th November 2015)

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paxton View Post
    Nope. It's a proper Torque Converting Auto.

    Far better in my opinion.
    Correct.

    the initial problem was oil leaking onto the clutch plates, that was fixed
    but now the problem with age is two fold, the build up of clutch material
    can't be cleared and them control module attached to a hot running box
    now tends to fail.

    None of that will bother new Focus owners as the 1.5 Ecoboost
    and American 6F gearbox is thoroughly reliable.

    I hope Ford sells tons of Focus, the 1.5 EB with either 6-speed manual
    or the 6F auto is a fun ride that brightens up a dull boring segment.
    The yanks have a nice aftermarket tune for the 1.5EB that turns its
    performance into just short of a standard 2.0 EB...

  11. #28
    Validated User pacificfordqld's Avatar
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    Anyone driven the new 1.5L turbo?

  12. #29
    T3/Sprint8 FTe217's Avatar
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    Glad you brought this up - where are any RS owner comments and pics ?
    YNWA ! off to CL 2018.
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  13. #30
    Validated User pacificfordqld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FTe217 View Post
    Glad you brought this up - where are any RS owner comments and pics ?
    Reasoning for the post is I've had quite a good drive in a Focus Sport auto demo we have.

    What a fantastic car. One of my favourite Ford's at the moment. Such a huge improvement everywhere. Engine is a cracker, auto is brilliant, dash is great and features are choc a block. As a package Focus Sport has it all for an every day driver. I highly recommend a test drive if you are in the market.

    Hit me up if you are local and would like a drive of ours.

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