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Thread: 2013 GT500 - Rocket Launcher

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    2013 GT500 - Rocket Launcher

    2013 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 - Rocket Launcher!
    A behind-the-scenes- look at this development of the new 650hp 2013 Shelby GT500.
    From the February, 2012 issue of Muscle Mustangs & Fast Fords
    By Evan J. Smith
    Photography by Pete Epple





    Point blank, no Mustang in history can match what Ford will release this year as a 2013 model. We're talking about the next Shelby GT500, and with 650 hp, 600 lb-ft of torque, and a top speed of over 200 mph, this Dearborn destroyer will leave no question as to which Pony car is king.

    Thanks to Ford, MM&FF staffers got a first-hand look into a hardcore development session with Ford engineers as they put the '13 GT500 through its paces. So what we're about to bring you is an unprecedented insider look at the newest muscle Mustang on the block.


    Outrageous power has always been a major selling point to the (latest) stable of GT500s. Most were amazed with 500 hp in '07, thrilled with the 40hp upgrade for '10 (and the 10 extra hp in '11), but knowing Ford's propensity to raise the bar, we wondered what it could do next? Now we have the answer.

    It's been long speculated that the next GT500 would get a sizeable increase in power. The Internet buzz suggested everything from twin turbos, to a modified version of the 6.2L Raptor engine. In the end, the engineers enhanced the existing platform.


    "The highlight [of the Shelby] is a new, 650hp engine with 5.8 liters by way of a jump in displacement (331-355 ci) thanks to a bore increase from 90.215 mm (3.55 inches) to 93.5 mm (3.68 inches). And we added a new 2.3L TVS supercharger," proudly states SVT engineer John Pfeiffer.

    "We've increased compression from 8.5:1 to 9.0, added [Ford] GT cams, and a cast-aluminum structured oil pan with increased capacity," he adds. The 5.8L blown brawler lives with 8 quarts of 5W50 synthetic running through its veins and oil squirters to supply a spray of lubrication to critical areas. Internally, the 5.8L engine benefits from five-layer head gaskets for improved combustion chamber seal, Mahle pistons with a smaller bowl area (13.2-10.3 cc), and a lightened, reduced-tension ring package. With a raised rev limit of 7,000 rpm, Pfeiffer says the engine will approach piston speeds found in Formula 1 racing.


    Topping the mod monster is a reengineered 2300 TVS. Its rotors feature a four-lobe design with a 160-degree twist. The inlet flows 33 percent more air (than the outgoing inlet) and it will make 15 psi of boost. The 550hp Shelby used a Roots-style 2.0L blower with 3-lobe rotors twisted to 60 degrees. It maxed out in stock trim at 9 psi, although some regularly spin them it faster to make more boost. The injector size is also increased from 46.7-lb-hr to 54.8-lb/hr units, and cooling the intake charge is a high-efficiency air-to-water intercoolerùbut that is just the tip of the performance iceberg.

    While the '07-'11 GT500s are fast machines, launching one can be a challenge, especially with stock tires. For the '13, Ford solved this problem with the introduction of Launch Control and Traction Control systems to maximize acceleration with minimal or, in most cases, zero slip. And believe us, the acceleration will quench even the thirstiest horsepower junkies. We got to experience these driver aids, and they are nothing short of amazing. Sweetening the pot is an adjustable rev controller (i.e., two-step) to help you dial in your launch.


    The rev control is not just a gimmick. It will offer a tunable starting-line rpm limiter, allowing you to coordinate launch rpm with the surface and tires you're running to achieve the best possible acceleration. In essence, the driver will be staged on the line (be it at the track or on the street) and with the clutch down, you will plant the throttle to the floor. The engine will hold at a pre-set rpm, and when it is time to go, the driver simply releases the clutch smooth and quick. Your GT500 will accelerate rapidly in a controlled manner, with the LC/TC preventing (or at least seriously limiting) wheelspin. After seeing the system in action, we can report that it performs at the level of even the best quarter-mile hot shoes.



    "So what we've done is design a [Launch Control] system that is flexible enough for a customer to take their Mustang to the dragstrip, or on the street in a controlled environment, and optimize acceleration for the surface you are on," explains Dan Dunn, the electronic brake control development engineer on Mustang. When it senses moderate wheel slip (tire spin), the system will manipulate [rear wheel] braking, ignition, and throttle to help the tires maintain grip.

    The system is so smart that in extreme circumstances it will exit LC. "There are hooks," says Dunn, "such as if you launch so hard that the vehicle produces wild tire spinùthen the system will exit LC mode. There is a complexity that's not obvious to the driver as it interfaces to manage acceleration using the powertrain controller, throttle, spark, and braking."


    Dunn, who is responsible for vehicle-level performance of ABS, traction control, stability control, and now specifically launch control, is also a drag racer. "Our system is robust," he states. "It works in real time and changes with conditions. It will adapt to changes in gearing within reason, and to many performance modification," he states enthusiastically.

    From the ride we got, we can say the system is actually more on the aggressive side, allowing moderate spin on launch and even during aggressive upshifts. It's not at all intrusive as some TC systems have been in the past. All too often, performance vehicles use TC and "torque management" to prevent or limit driveline failure by severely kicking back the power. This is evident in the '10 Camaro, which practically falls on its face if you try to powershift it. But Ford gets it, as you'd barely know the system is active and working in your favor.

    In fact, after seeing it work, I recommend leaving the driver aids on for all conditions. I've often driven Mustangs in which the tuner has reflashed the computer and permanently locked traction control in the Off position. This is not necessary, as most won't be able to outperform the capabilities of Ford's system.


    To handle the newly found power, Ford has upgraded the clutch to a larger diameter, twin-disc unit; the transmission gears feature less helix; and the case and bearings have been strengthened, too. Mating the transmission to the fortified 8.8 is a one-piece carbon-fiber driveshaft that is 13 pounds lighter than the old steel two-piece assembly.

    To control the massive torque (500 lb-ft at 2,000 rpm and a peak of 600 at 4,000), Ford has reeled back the rear gear ratio to 3.31 (from 3.55 or optional 3.73). The gearing will undoubtedly help achieve the estimated top speed that is just north of 200 mph. Though the engineers won't confirm that the Shelby could pass the double-century mark, when I asked if the GT500 could top 200, they couldn't hide their smiles. The 3.31 will also help some drivers (especially on cold or marginal surfaces) find traction. Nevertheless, we'd give up 20 mph of top end for a harder launch.


    So, how quick will it go in the quarter-mile? We estimate that the 650hp GT500 will be capable of running 11.70s to 11.60s at well above 120 mph in bone-stock trim. In optimal conditions, perhaps quicker and faster. And with 4.30s and sticky tires, low 11s or even 10s could be possible!

    From what we saw, the '13 GT500 will be a ground-breaking Mustang that people will get in line to purchase. So keep your eyes peeled to MM&FF as we continue to report on this fabulous machine. We're planning a full-on track assault just as soon as Ford can get us a production GT500.

    Read more: http://www.musclemustangfastfords.co...#ixzz1v2Z4CuPL
    “…The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man are disgraceful to ourselves only…How one man single-handedly, could weld warring tribes and wandering Bedouins into a most powerful and civilized nation in less than two decades….A silent great soul, one of that who cannot but be earnest. He was to kindle the world; the world’s Maker had ordered so." - Thomas Carlyle

  2. #2
    Mid 11s? Bye bye ZL1.
    “…The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man are disgraceful to ourselves only…How one man single-handedly, could weld warring tribes and wandering Bedouins into a most powerful and civilized nation in less than two decades….A silent great soul, one of that who cannot but be earnest. He was to kindle the world; the world’s Maker had ordered so." - Thomas Carlyle

  3. #3
    An LC system like that in our GT... hmmm.. Seems like SVT has the LC down pat - amazing what you can achieve when there's money to spend. Let's hope this beastie can negotiate the twisties as well as the ZL1... here's a vid if you haven't seen it already... http://www.falconforums.com.au/showt...431-2013-gt500
    “…The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man are disgraceful to ourselves only…How one man single-handedly, could weld warring tribes and wandering Bedouins into a most powerful and civilized nation in less than two decades….A silent great soul, one of that who cannot but be earnest. He was to kindle the world; the world’s Maker had ordered so." - Thomas Carlyle

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    Validated User ToCo's Avatar
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    If give anything to have one of those, what a car!!

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    T3/Sprint8 FTe217's Avatar
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    Friggin !
    YNWA ! off to CL 2018.
    Sydney is Sky Blue HAL Premiers/Champions 2017 - the Double.

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    7753 - 5030 HSE2's Avatar
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    So is this a Coyote or still the old engine?
    History is a statement, the future is a question.

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    Validated User Uzza335's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HSE2 View Post
    So is this a Coyote or still the old engine?
    Still the old engine Ian. I would love the launch control in the GT!
    edit: Although it is heavily modified from the old engine.

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    The Biggest Hammer Of Them All Is Sharper Than Ever



    We would love to be able to look you square in the eye and say, "All you need to know about the 2013 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 can be summed up in one figure: 662." After all, that's the obscene amount of horsepower ripping at the rear tires courtesy of the supercharged 5.8-liter V8 under the hood. Unfortunately, it's not quite that simple. For the first time in its life, the GT500 has found itself lined up against a legitimate competitor in the Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. The muscle car/supercar crossbreed from General Motors is stitched to conquer not only the quarter mile, but the nation's road courses as well.

    In order to answer that threat, the engineers at Ford have laid a hand on nearly every mechanical and electrical system on board the GT500. While that means the blown V8 churns out a diabolical 112 more horsepower than the previous model, it also means the top-tier Mustang now comes with tricks like user-selectable Bilstein dampers, adjustable electronic power steering, larger brakes and an array of optional cooling systems. In fact, if this car came wrapped in a slightly different shade of sheetmetal, we'd be talking about an all-new model instead of a refresh.







    From the outside looking in, there are only a few markers to distinguish the 2013 Shelby GT500 from the 2012 model. Those start with a new front fascia with a gaping, open maw of a grille. Ford has deleted the meshwork found in the old piece to optimize the amount of air pouring into the engine bay in the kind of the function-over-form move that turns us giggly. Clever ductwork also provides additional downforce and funnels air into a new radiator fan that incorporates an additional blade and passive vent flaps in the shroud designed to pull a maximum amount of air through the radiator when the vehicle is stopped. The flaps flip open to minimize resistance once the vehicle is in motion. Aesthetically, the new nose gives the coupe a set of catfish sucker lips, and the void looks as if it would be happy to draw in any wayward limbs foolish enough to stray too close.



    Like its more common siblings, the 2013 GT500 benefits from new headlight arrays trimmed with LED accents. Move to the coupe's side, and the changes are even more subtle. The uninitiated would be forgiven for missing the significantly upgraded brakes. A set of six-piston Brembo monoblock calipers clamp down on 15-inch rotors up front. The pizza pans do a smart job of filling up the 19-inch front wheels, and at more than an inch larger than the old stock, the rotors handle repeated road course abuse without so much as considering warpage. Likewise, Ford grew the rear discs to 13.8 inches from the previous iteration's 11.8. While those front calipers are loaded with the same pad material as the 2012 model, the rears now squeeze with a more aggressive compound.



    With extra aero work, iconic snake badges and retina-snatching stripes, this Shelby has no intention of being understated.
    On the street, the stoppers are a work of art. They provide perfect bite with initial pedal pressure and continue to bring the sizable coupe down from serious speed with ease in a nice linear fashion without excessive travel. We did find that the material started to fade after a few hard laps around Road Atlanta, where we were fortunate enough to sample the machine's more athletic qualities. The reality is, there are only a handful of GT500 buyers who will ever take their purchase to a road course for hard abuse – let alone one as challenging as Road Atlanta – but those few who will should plan on upgrading to a more aggressive pad before taking their first apex.

    Around back, the 2013 Shelby boasts the same sexy LED taillamps, sequential turn indicators and LED reverse lights as the standard Mustang, though a large spoiler and new quad exhaust outlets work to set the car apart not only from the rest of the Mustang family, but the machine's predecessor as well. Not that there's any danger of mistaking the GT500 for a V6 model. With extra aero work, iconic snake badges and retina-snatching stripes, this Shelby has no intention of being understated.
    History is a statement, the future is a question.

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    As brash as the top-tier Mustang is outside, designers have created a surprisingly refined cabin inside. A handsome three-spoke steering wheel with brushed metal accents offers all the appropriate contours at nine and three as well as a combination of suede and good-quality leather. Look beyond the wheel, and the 2013 Shelby GT500 serves up a tweaked version of a familiar gauge cluster. The speedometer now reaches all the way to 220 miles per hour, and while that may seem like a bit of prideful boasting, the truth is this pony has the bones to sprint all the way to 200 mph given enough track. (Not that your eyes would be looking anywhere other than straight down the course at such velocities.)



    This pony has the bones to sprint all the way to 200 mph given enough track.
    Then there's the tachometer. Ford built the supercharged 5.8-liter V8 under the hood with an over-rev function that allows the engine to swing past its standard 6,250 rpm redline to a screaming 7,000 rpm for eight seconds at a time. Exceed that window and the ECU will pull the rpm back to more sane levels for a spell. The tach, meanwhile, features an SVT shift light that illuminates at the standard redline and stays bright all the way to seven grand.

    As with other Mustang models, a 4.2-inch LCD screen nestled between both analog gauges handles a variety of vehicle systems, from trip meters and average fuel economy readings to more engaging functions like the much ballyhooed Track Apps and launch control configuration. Unique to the GT500, engineers have also programmed in a clever boost/vacuum gauge so the driver can keep an eye on exactly what that big supercharger is up to at all times.



    As nice as the steering wheel and gauges are, they aren't the stars of the interior show. Slightly reworked Recaro bucket seats with Alcantara accents in all the right places and stitching color-matched to the vehicle's stripe option provide excellent support, and the short-throw cue ball shifter feels like mechanized perfection in your hand. With stiff springs and a deliciously mechanical-feeling engagement, the shifter is all kinds of magical and makes for easy and precise shifts. That's the case when power-shifting down the quarter mile or dropping a gear while quickly approaching a turn. Other manufacturers, take heed: This is how you build a shifter. Throw in a set of well-positioned pedals that all but plead for fancy footwork, and the cabin quickly outs itself as a palace of hoonery.



    Other manufacturers, take heed: This is how you build a shifter.
    Speaking of pedals, Ford says its engineers spent plenty of time fretting over the clutch in the GT500. With 662 horsepower to funnel to the rear wheels, the company needed a clutch that could effectively drop anchor in the flywheel and vaporize the Goodyear F1 Supercar tires on command. That required moving from a 250-mm piece to a new 260-mm dual-disc clutch with more aggressive facing material and clamp load characteristics than before. All of that translates to a fairly stiff pedal that requires around 30 pounds of force to stuff into the carpet. The stiff throw is a perfect reminder you're piloting a machine capable of reversing the Earth's polarity at whim, though we can imagine the gold chain and flat brim set may find the action a bit too laborious for stop-and-go service.

    Of course, it's easy to forget all about pesky details like clutch pedal pressure the first time your right foot gets frisky with the accelerator. Bang from first to second and the GT500 will wiggle its haunches, crescendo into a feral bark and mark its territory with 60 feet worth of very expensive rubber. And that's with traction control on. The secret to why that's possible lies in the aforementioned supercharged V8. Ford engaged in a little no-stone-unturned engineering when it came time to craft the all-aluminum creation at the heart of the 2013 Shelby.
    History is a statement, the future is a question.

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    7753 - 5030 HSE2's Avatar
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    That party started by increasing the bore by 3.28 mm while also nudging the compression from 8.4:1 to 9:1. A little rustling around in the parts bin came up with a set of revised Ford GT camshafts with more duration and lift, and the Eaton Twin Vortices Series blower breathes through a larger intercooler and now boasts an inlet that's a full 33-percent larger than before. The supercharger displaces 2.3 liters and requires 150 horsepower just to turn over. It's these kinds of figures that leave a trail of awe and horror scribbled on our faces.



    These kinds of figures leave a trail of awe and horror scribbled on our faces.
    Ford has also reworked nearly the entire fuel system to keep the beast fed. Engineers ditched the old steel tank for a plastic version to save weight and a new set of 54.8 pound-per-hour fuel injectors keep all eight cylinders eating happily. The 2013 GT500 actually makes use of two of the same fuel pumps found on the Mustang GT, which results in nearly twice the available fuel volume as the 2012 model. This machine isn't going to starve any time soon.

    We asked SVT boss Jamal Hameedi why his team opted to eschew direct injection in favor of traditional low-pressure fuel delivery. Hameedi said the simple answer was that while Ford looked into going DI on the 5.8-liter, it proved unnecessary. As it sits, the V8 delivers 112 more horsepower, 121 more pound-feet of torque and nets one mpg better in the city and on the highway than the old lump. Hameedi says bolting on a direct-injection system typically adds anywhere from 12 to 20 pounds to a vehicle – something his team had no interest in doing.



    Not all of the changes to the engine were designed to increase horsepower, however. With so much grunt on tap, Ford also turned an eye toward doing what it could to ensure longevity, including swapping the old oil pump for a new unit capable of moving up to 70 percent more volume. Not a bad idea considering the 5.8-liter V8 carries a whopping 9.5 quarts of oil in its aluminum oil pan compared to the 6.5 quarts in the old 5.4. Squirters work to keep the pistons cool at all times. Big power inevitably generates big heat, and engineers have resorted to cross-drilling both the block and the heads to increase the number of available passages for engine coolant. Those who plan on really hammering the GT500 around a road course can purchase an optional Track Package that rolls in external coolers for the rear differential, transmission and engine oil.



    There is no automatic option. Congratulations, SVT. You just made our holiday card list.
    Any drivetrain is only as good as its weakest link, and the Tremec six-speed manual-transmission in the GT500 has gone under the knife in a big way. Most of the gearbox's bearings have been upgraded to handle the added stress of the extra power available, and each gear now employs a new helix angle to be able to handle more torque than before. Likewise, the output shaft now packs 40 splines compared to the 28 splines in the old cog box. Perhaps more importantly, there is no automatic transmission option. Congratulations, SVT. You just made our holiday card list.

    The 2013 GT500 has also ditched its old steel driveshaft in favor of a new single-piece carbon fiber unit, singlehandedly saving over 14 pounds. In addition to being lighter, the new composite creation can handle 36 percent more torque and allows the GT500 to reach that magical 200 mph limit. That simply wasn't possible with the old driveshaft. Finally, the rear axle is now available with a Torsen limited-slip differential, though the only gear ratio on the list is 3.31:1.





    So, what does all that good stuff add up to? Officially, Ford says the car will run an 11.7-second quarter mile at around 125 mph on stock tires, though word from the engineers on hand is that the car has already improved upon that time. We're about as far from being drag racers as corn is from being a cow, but even we managed to squeeze a 12.221 at 121 mph out of the machine in short order. The sprint to 60 mph takes just 3.7 seconds if you dial in launch control correctly, and 100 mph will blow by in 7.9 seconds. Ford made a point of illustrating that all of those numbers are nearly dead-even with those of the legendary Ford GT. But that's all straight-line performance. If the 2013 Ford Mustang GT taught us anything, it's that Ford is quietly pointing the entire line more toward sports car dominance. The 2013 GT500 is no different.



    The GT500's performance numbers are nearly dead-even with those of the legendary Ford GT.
    We spent a few abbreviated laps around Road Atlanta with the Shelby and found ourselves stunned at not only the machine's drivability, but its trackability. Here's a big coupe that tips the scales at over 3,800 pounds with 662 horsepower routed to two wheels. We expected to find ourselves listing port and starboard as the big boat bobbed its way around the track and plowed past apexes as it tried its best to swap ass for nose. This couldn't have been farther from the case.

    Ford worked with the suspension gurus at Bilstein to come up with a new driver-adjustable damping system. Push a button on the dash and a solenoid in each damper physically switches the valving inside. The engineers at SVT specifically focused on making the adjustable features in the GT500 as easy to access and utilize as possible, which is also why buyers don't have to fumble through a maze of menus to nix traction control or adjust the electronic power steering from comfort to sport. All very handy.



    With everything set to sport, the GT500 is remarkably sharp and poised. Come into an apex, dig deep in the brakes, set up your line, pour on the throttle and the car simply heeds your commands with surprisingly little drama. This is a car that's happy to woo you into thinking, "Yeah, I can absolutely handle the world's most powerful production V8." Ford designed the GT500 with a four-stage traction control system, from full on to full off, with Sport mode allowing a little more tail-happy shenanigans without leaving you alone in the room with all that torque. Needless to say, we preferred Sport mode, and found the system to be more than forgiving enough. When we did brush up against the electronic overlords, the gadgetry didn't fully pull the wind from the car's sails. As far as traction control goes, this setup is about as lovable as it gets.



    It clearly has the brawn to put our inadequacies on it shoulders and carry us to glory.
    The vast expanse of torque from the big V8 is as addicting as it is forgiving. This car doesn't need you to know exactly which gear you need to be in for every apex. It clearly has the brawn to put our inadequacies on it shoulders and carry us to glory. First gear will bolt all the to 60 mph. Second? Well past 100. Third? Well, let's just say we never felt the need to sample fourth during our abbreviated runs around Road Atlanta even with the speedometer licking at 133 mph half-way down the back straight.

    At this point, we can feel the wave of "lolz, solid axle FTL, lolz" reader comments washing our way. We've said it over, and over, and over again. The Ford suspension crew has worked some sort of miracle with the ox-cart gear in the Mustang, and that magic continues to be present in the GT500. It's almost as if the team delights in flipping conventional wisdom the bird. After flogging the hide from this machine, we're squarely on their side on this one. Why bother changing the recipe when what they have tastes so damn good?



    Move to public streets, and the 2013 GT500 is stunningly compliant. The switchable Bilsteins are a work of art. Switched to Comfort mode, the dampers soak up pockmarked Georgia byways with the kind of grand-touring float that shouldn't be possible from a machine that's so happy consuming fistfuls of racetrack. The blown V8 is happy to burble along in stop-and-go traffic or eviscerate slow-moving commuters in beautiful flourishes of torque and snarl. It damn near brings a tear to the eye.



    The price is within spitting distance of a base Cadillac CTS-V Coupe and nearly a Nissan Versa more expensive than a base Chevrolet Camaro ZL1.
    The 2013 Ford Shelby GT500 starts at $54,200, though the SVT Performance Package with its specific spring rates, adjustable Bilstein dampers and Torsen limited slip rear will set you back another $3,495. Want the extra cooling capacity found in the Track Package? Get ready to pony up an extra $2,995. Likewise, our excellent Recaro buckets are a $1,595 option, which brings our grand total to $63,080, including a $795 destination fee. That's not even including fanciness like a Shaker Pro audio system or voice-activated navigation.

    That number sits within spitting distance of a base Cadillac CTS-V Coupe and is nearly a Nissan Versa more expensive than a base Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. But these types of comparisons may miss the point entirely. In the span of a few short years, domestic automakers have gone from being able to offer one real competitor to the world's supercars, the Chevrolet Corvette, to a plethora of largely inexpensive, brutally powerful and surprisingly poised models. The 2013 Ford Shelby GT500 is the latest addition to that cadre, and anyone shopping for models with a Porsche crest or an AMG badge on the bodywork would do well to look under the Stars and Stripes for their next toy.
    History is a statement, the future is a question.

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