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Thread: Who would you rather review a car? Journalists or VLoggers?

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    Miami Sprint. 4Vman's Avatar
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    Who would you rather review a car? Journalists or VLoggers?

    https://drivetribe.com/p/question-wo...source=organic

    There's no two ways about it, media is in the middle of a massive upheaval. 'YouTuber' and 'influencer' are now genuine job titles and are becoming the most popular career choice in the aspirational minds of youngsters. Buy yourself a half decent camera, a flexible tripod and some editing software and you have everything you need to be earning a living through uploading low-rent videos that often lead to brand sponsorship deals.

    In relation to our industry, car manufacturers and event organisers now invite these influencers to the same launches and events that the old-school journalists from high profile magazines have been going to for decades. And I don't say that in a negative tone - in fact, it would be silly for the automotive PR companies not to.


    This new crop of YouTubers can fly out to a car launch, share pictures and instagram stories with their thousands (if not millions) of fans and can film, edit and upload entertaining videos all in a matter of 24-48 hours. Meanwhile, the mainstream mags will take HD footage which is perfectly executed, trimmed and scripted to cinematic standards. That produces some lovely looking content, it's just far too late compared to the slash-and-dash vloggers.

    To start off with a comparison, here is Autocar's video of the Ferrari 812 Superfast:


    Although I am a writer, I am actually an avid follower of a couple of popular UK automotive vloggers, the chief among which being Sam Fane, the face of the 'Seen Through Glass' channel. A maniacal Ferrari fan, the energy he gives off on camera is engaging and his content is constantly fresh and genuinely interesting. He gives off a sense of honesty and humbleness that makes his channel very approachable.


    By following these YouTube stars and obviously being involved within mainstream automotive journalism, I had the impression that there's been a slight tension building between the old powerhouses and the new young bucks of our space in media. And, finally, it came to a head on Twitter just last night.

    I won't name any names, but another mainstay of the UK car vlogger community responded to a since deleted tweet. Said tweet called-out manufacturers for inviting influencers to car launches instead of 'proper' journalists, highlighting a lack of quality, seriousness and taste from the new guys on the block. The vlogger's reply read as follows:


    Now, using the phrase 'no one cares' was a bit of a rash call from the prominent YouTuber, as in swung the editor of one of the biggest car magazine titles in the business:


    Then things started to get rather petty, with subscriber counts and video views being used as cannon fodder in the same way as an eight-year-old kid would flaunt his fidget spinner collection in the school playground.


    Things got messy after this...
    So, after a bit of scrapping with other YouTubers and staff from mainstream media outlets getting involved, quite a large and important question slowly floated to the top of the Twitter audience's resulting conversation - which type of content do you actually relate to?

    From what I've watched, vloggers will edit their pieces the night after they've tested a car and have it uploaded by the evening of the next day. Meanwhile, mainstream mags and media outlets will fly back and spend hours making the best film they possibly can.


    The final tweet of the online scuffle from the editor
    I guess the question is, does speed always win? Is time the dominant factor over absolute quality? Yes, the well-edited videos can be pretty to look at, but do you actually take more from them than a 10-minute vlog?

    Do old-school scripted car reviews have any foothold with millennials? Or has YouTube and its countless stars now created an accessible, entertaining alternative that simply beats monthly magazines and cinematic reviews to the line?

    Popular YouTubers - whether they be in fashion, travel, tech or sports - are now on par with bona fide celebrities, even when compared to the music and film industries. And in UK car media, it's Seen Through Glass, Supercars Of london and Shmee150 that have crowds of youngsters and genuine fans flocking to meet them at shows like the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Meanwhile, journalists just seem like well-dressed spectators.


    Personally, I believe that as it stands, there is space enough for both the old school and the new school. But if car brands want to appeal to a young, thriving audience online, the new breed of vloggers certainly have the upper hand.

    Since DriveTribe as a platform effectively has a foot in both camps, we are extremely interested to see what you guys think, as we feel like there's going to be heavily split opinions on this pressing subject. So please cast your vote below as to where you stand on how car reviews should be orchestrated:
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    Vlogger, some of the best car vids and reviews I've seen have been amateur.

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    T3/Sprint8 FTe217's Avatar
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    Arise HSE2 blogger.....
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    Danger Zone! Paxton's Avatar
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    Third option - car enthusiast.

    Journalists have in Australia precipitated over the end of our car industry - I am pointing my two middle fingers at you Joshua Dowling.

    I hate videos on websites except for YouTube. I actively avoid sites which auto play videos. I would rather read a well informed and well written review from someone who likes cars more than pushing an agenda (be that green cars, anti-diesel etc).

    Edit: iPhone reply in traffic...
    Last edited by Paxton; 13th July 2017 at 09:48 AM.
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    Tech Admin flappist's Avatar
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    Pros of vloggers:
    1) They will probably know a lot more about the vehicle than the journos as they tend to be enthusiasts.
    2) With regard to performance they will try and try again to get it right.
    3) They are unlikely to be influenced by editors or accountants.

    Cons of vloggers:
    1) They often tend to push their personal agenda e.g. 6 vs 8 or manual vs auto or 2 vs 4 doors or RWD vs FWD etc.
    2) They will hide/ignore weaknesses in their "favorites" and highlight strengths while doing the exact opposite in cars that they do not like.
    3) They are very likely to be influenced by peer pressure.

    I believe that there needs to be a balanced mix of both with reviews like the PCOTY and BFYB where each reviewer has a few lines of editiorial and any performance results denoted in tables that show both vehicle and driver results.

    e.g. If Norm was part of the MOTOR Sprint review the 0-100 times would not be so bad as either the journos would show they do not understand how to drive the car or they would take notice and do it properly.
    The same can be said for others. When I did the FGx release I was amazed at just how bad many of the journos were at driving and quite disappointed at some of the very negative comments made even before they had driven any of them.
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    Miami Sprint. 4Vman's Avatar
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    I've actually made suggestions for events like PCOTY that they include 1 or 2 "amateur" bloggers or people to represent the average performance enthusiast.

    In the main the real professional journalists (not the pretend clickbait antagonists) are in effect amateur racers, ex racers or extremely competent drivers, they represent 1% of the broad driving ability of those interested in owning the products they test.

    I'm sure there would be legal reasons precluding this from happening but it would add another element and different perspective to these reviews.
    My Falcon family heritage: XY V8 Falcon 500, XYGT, XBGT, XC 351 GS, XD 4.1 Spack, EF wagon, AU Wagon, AU2 Wagon, AU2 XR8, BA XR8, BF XR8, FG XR6, Lucky last: Sprint 8. Oh wait, AU3 XLS Marlin Ute!

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  12. #7
    7753 - 5030 HSE2's Avatar
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    Haven't they done this before with subscriber comps?

    Maybe it was bang for buck which makes more sense.

    Anyone has the capability to put together a compelling, informative review or talk.

    There are many a YouTuber making supposedly good money off telling their life story about cars they own or modify.

    It's more entertaining than informative but it works.

    Look at Clarkson, Hammond and May. There are better reviewers out there, better drivers, but not all can hold your attention and connect with viewers.
    History is a statement, the future is a question.

  13. #8
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    I frequently watch videos by James Martin on youtube, he's a car enthusiast and does an absolutely stellar job of giving information on vehicles.

    If any of you are interested.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkw...lir6qsg/videos

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  15. #9
    James. defective's Avatar
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    I generally don't watch or read reviews when the brand being reviewed is a clear favourite of the reviewer.

    As much as they can try to keep their own bias out it never works. I find that just as irritating as those with a bias against the car.
    Quote Originally Posted by Falc'man View Post
    In the words of a wise man: if you don't read the papers you're uninformed, if you do read the papers you're misinformed.

  16. #10
    Aka Captain Slow TS50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by defective View Post
    I generally don't watch or read reviews when the brand being reviewed is a clear favourite of the reviewer.

    As much as they can try to keep their own bias out it never works. I find that just as irritating as those with a bias against the car.
    such as "the Car Expert" who hates Ford and Mercedes, but loves Toyota and BMW

    He is so biased its not funny
    2002 T3 Manual Naroma Blue TS-50 (049)Sunroof, Premium Sound, Black/Blue Leather, Brembos

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