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Thread: 10 speed Auto goes into limp mode again

  1. #21
    Validated User Burnout's Avatar
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    Over heated the trans fluid?
    Run a cooler.... ?
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  2. #22
    Miami Sprint. 4Vman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burnout View Post
    Over heated the trans fluid?
    Run a cooler.... ?
    Its not the trans.... Its the engine overheating..
    My Falcon family heritage: XY V8 Falcon 500, XYGT, XBGT, XC 351 GS, XD 4.1 Spack, EF wagon, AU Wagon, AU2 Wagon, AU2 XR8, BA XR8, BF XR8, FG XR6, Lucky last: Sprint 8. Oh wait, AU3 XLS Marlin Ute!

  3. #23
    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HSE2 View Post
    I can confirm, it’s not track work that causes this so it’s not the right response from Ford to make.

    All track works does is make it easier and quicker. Like adding a supercharger, all that does is get it there quicker into the fault.

    I am curious as to why this wasn’t picked up in development. It does suggest the car is protecting itself based on a falsehood OR a running change has lowered the threshold of tolerance.

    I will have to read the article again when I am off my phone, but from memory the publication claims that on 2 occasions professional drivers (race) in 2 different tracks got the car into limp mode. Then in this recent test once the car had gone there, cooled off, a journo was able to get the car into limp mode again in under two laps ona wet Winton track.

    Let me categorically state, that driving should not cause limp mode. You can see TC is off, you can see the conditions aren’t allowing for WOT and when he tries it goes into wheel spin. That’s a driveline friendly track. It’s open for Christ sake and in May at Winton.


    It’s not like it’s in a still air canyon.


    To put this in perspective, relevant to me, the car won’t survive Cethana. It won’t survive the enclosed nature of thatbroad and elevation. I do note that they have indeed seen it go into limp in hill road. It would have to.


    If you guys have experienced the 10 speed you will realise it’s making life very hard for that engine. It’s not really giving it a chance to rest and as such throttle input is negated by all the gears it has at its disposal. Gears that by design keep the engine working at the high end of load.

    It might not be the trans or even the engine but it’s reacting to heat somewhere in the system. It’s protecting itself for a reason.
    Not engine related but if there is one thing that annoys me about mine is the tech is a bit glitchy, especially with things like alerts going off and the interior command center having a mind of its own sometimes. Certainly nothing mechanical or heat-related however. Doing a bit more snooping on google for evidence of similar issues found overseas with the 2018-19 Mustang GT auto model and coming up with a big fat zero. This makes me wonder if the issue is related to the RHD conversion model only. In the US, people are hammering their cars, with no overheating issues to speak of.
    Lifetime Ford Falcon enthusiast and previous owner of the following models XR, XY, XB, XC, XD, EB, AU, BA and FG.
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    Mustang enthusiast and current owner of a 1969 Mach 1 351 4V 4-barrel M-Code + 2018 Mustang GT 10 speed

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  5. #24
    Franco 'Sportsbet' Cozzo Franco Cozzo's Avatar
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    It would be interesting to get a diagnostic scanner on it and monitor temperatures when it cracks the sads and goes into limp mode.

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  7. #25
    Validated User WASP's Avatar
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    Yes it would. On the RHD theory, heat related issues can occur when things like exhaust manifolds are positioned too close to brake boosters and other sensors. Problems only arise under extreme conditions.


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    Lifetime Ford Falcon enthusiast and previous owner of the following models XR, XY, XB, XC, XD, EB, AU, BA and FG.
    Current owner of a BA Mk2 FPV GT and a FG XR6 Turbo

    Mustang enthusiast and current owner of a 1969 Mach 1 351 4V 4-barrel M-Code + 2018 Mustang GT 10 speed

  8. #26
    Miami Sprint. 4Vman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Franco Cozzo View Post
    It would be interesting to get a diagnostic scanner on it and monitor temperatures when it cracks the sads and goes into limp mode.
    You can actually bring up head temperatures on the ICC, not sure how accurate the readout is but the common denominator was cyl head temps when it went into limp mode.
    My Falcon family heritage: XY V8 Falcon 500, XYGT, XBGT, XC 351 GS, XD 4.1 Spack, EF wagon, AU Wagon, AU2 Wagon, AU2 XR8, BA XR8, BF XR8, FG XR6, Lucky last: Sprint 8. Oh wait, AU3 XLS Marlin Ute!

  9. #27
    Content Moderator Donut King's Avatar
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    Guess it makes sense for something with such a high compression ratio to be sensitive to cylinder head temps, also why forced induction fast tracks the meltdown

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  11. #28
    Franco 'Sportsbet' Cozzo Franco Cozzo's Avatar
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    I wonder if it's a water flow issue through the heads - I imagine the cylinder head temperature sensor would be located at the rear of the heads at the furthest point away from the water pump.

    Cramped engine bay, busy front end, 10sp auto working the engine hard, Australian conditions - perfect storm to show up lack of real world testing.

    Ford's excuse is pitiful - Mustang is designed for normal driving - 339KW V8 under the hood to sit in Melbourne and Sydney traffic in 1st gear at 7km/h trying to avoid Taxis running reds while you're trying to hook turn.

  12. #29
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    This isnt Auto only. It also affects manual transmission equipped cars.

    Very disappointing....
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  13. #30
    7753 - 5030 HSE2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WASP View Post
    Not engine related but if there is one thing that annoys me about mine is the tech is a bit glitchy, especially with things like alerts going off and the interior command center having a mind of its own sometimes. Certainly nothing mechanical or heat-related however. Doing a bit more snooping on google for evidence of similar issues found overseas with the 2018-19 Mustang GT auto model and coming up with a big fat zero. This makes me wonder if the issue is related to the RHD conversion model only. In the US, people are hammering their cars, with no overheating issues to speak of.
    The advice I have received does point to a RHD possibility.

    There is some weird ones being thrown around which makes me think there are some guessing going on. Which to me indicates the car isn’t throwing a code to say precisely why it’s going into limp. That’s somewhat unbelievable.

    Relating it back to my work, some of the numbers we allow operators to see aren’t triggers as such. There are higher numbers hidden away that cause trips or in this case limp mode.

    With the cylinder temps, my initial reaction was, is that really an issue. Some quick research in the US seems to indicate a car stuck in traffic in Arizona is reaching 240 head temps which is about 115 degrees. That’s zero load, just not moving.

    An ambient intake of 110 is causing a drop in performance but not limp.

    To my way of thinking if the car goes into limp whatever is causing it should be flashing on the screen not leaving owners to guess. It’s just weird.
    History is a statement, the future is a question.

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